chess against computer

Chess Against Computer

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calmrolfe 112 ( +1 | -1 )
Find the missing words These two chess players hated each other's guts, they detested each other. One was the World Champion and the other his closest rival.

The World Champion sneeringly talked of his rival thus "........ is a thinker, fond of deep and complex speculation. He will accept the efficacy and usefulness of a move if at the same time he considers it beautiful and theoretically right. But I accept this sort beauty only if and when it happens to be useful. He admires an idea for it's depth, I admire it for it's efficacy. My opponent believes in beauty, I believe in strength. I think that by being strong, a move is beautiful too"

His opponent was incandescent with rage and stormed up to the World Champion "To you ............ I have only three words, check and mate !!!!!"

Who were the two mystery gentlemen ?

Kind regards,

Cal

PS It might come as a great surprise to tonlesu, in view of some earlier comments
:0)
but the latter gentleman, when asked why he had played so poorly came up with the classic excuse "that the lovely town was so charming and attractive, and a number of enchanting causes rendered me to too happy to play good chess"
tonlesu 5 ( +1 | -1 )
missing words Herr Lasker...

the two gentlemen Lasker and Tarrasch
calmrolfe 94 ( +1 | -1 )
And the place ? It could only be the charming seaside resort of Hastings. I don't know if the overcoats were compulsory then. The players had a very gentile life, in between rounds they were entertained by music recitals on Hastings Pier and regularly dined together. I have seen one of the 1895 menu's, suffice to say I am very jealous of the cuisine they were served.

Presumably the hostess had the good grace to sit Messrs Lasker and Tarrasch at opposite ends of the table........

Kind regards,

Cal


In an earlier Cat XX message a certain Jacques Mieses was mentioned......which reminds me, Herr Mieses once spent a whole train journey (from San Sebastion ? 1911 to Munich) in the company of an outstandingly brilliant chess player, who, for the whole of the long journey was afflicted by a fly which constantly settled on his head. Do you know who the player was. I will give you a clue, it was ultimately due to end as a very sad story and the brilliant player was destined to die destitute....
bluebabygirl 90 ( +1 | -1 )
to Camrolfe I know who that player was. None other than my chess hero!! Akiba Rubinstein, only the greatest endgame player ever!! Only the greatest player to have never become champion!!!!! Only the greatest player ever! Only player to my knowledge to win five consecutive international tournaments in one year . That year was 1912 ,he took first at tournaments-San Sebastian ,Pistyan,Bresau.Warsaw,,and Vilna-that year came to be known as the Rubinstein year among the chess elite.That record has never been duplicated before or since. The book -Rubinstein's Chess Masterpieces ,once read and studied will convince anybody that my opinion of him is correct! Caissa told me she had to smite him with that mental affliction because he was even better than she!-----We all know what a jealous mistress Caissa is--BBG
calmrolfe 55 ( +1 | -1 )
bbg That was a bit of a tough one for most people, but no sweat for an acknowledged Rubinstein fan such as yourself.

I think the imaginary fly that he couldn't stop landing on his head was perhaps the first indication of a mental problem that was due to become progressively worse. A shame, because he was a brilliant chess player.

I suppose it only goes to re-inforce the idea that genius and madness are separated by only a very fine line.

Your turn to get us all guessing with a good question now bbg..... ?

Kind regards,

Cal


Damn....not again !!.....where's my bl..dy fly swatter !!!

?....

bluebabygirl 28 ( +1 | -1 )
to any What famous player that used to sign his autograph as well as Fischers'?? Explaining with a smile that his 4-0 victory over Bobby made the American his slave. And name the chess event and year that this famous player was referring to.-BBG
tonlesu 5 ( +1 | -1 )
Tal Tal went 4-0 against Bobby at 59' candidates tournament.
bluebabygirl 42 ( +1 | -1 )
to any Correct Tonlesu . Now a very hard one!! Alibis for losing a game of chess are so common that British master Burns once ,said" I have never beat a healthy man". However this alibi was quite a shocker. - "I am in love." - This alibi was given by a champion after losing 2 games and defaulting all the rest in a reserve tournament of the Hastings Christmas Congress. -Name that Champion?---BBG
tonlesu 4 ( +1 | -1 )
love Sounds like Lisa Lane.
bluebabygirl 3 ( +1 | -1 )
tonlesu Correct it was Lisa Lane.---BBG
irish-pete 10 ( +1 | -1 )
Sure it isn't Lois Lane? "A world without Pete would be less stable and more dangerous for all of us." Margaret Thatcher
tonlesu 9 ( +1 | -1 )
Lois Lane Was a weakie! Superman could spot her a knight and still clean her clock.

UP, UP AND AWAY!
cairo 22 ( +1 | -1 )
Who walk around and gave out visitcards with his name and following title on: "Challenger to The World Championship in Chess"

Best wishes
Cairo
tonlesu 1 ( +1 | -1 )
challenger Nimzovich!
calmrolfe 45 ( +1 | -1 )
Presumably the reverse side of the card said "How can I allow myself to LOSE TO THIS IDIOT !!"

Nimzovitxh was surly, arrogant, conceited and was considered to be almost paranoiac. Noise bothered him, spectators bothered him, playing conditions bothered him......

Gee... Almost the same biography as for Bobby Fischer !!!!

Despite his personal problems he was responsible for producing what may well have been the best instructional Chess book of all time, "My System"

Kind regards,

Cal



cAL
cairo 74 ( +1 | -1 )
Right on tonlesu of course, I knew you knew Jim :-))

The Danish Chess Association DSU in Danish: Dansk Skak Union, is having a fund in bonds, which is taking care of Nimzowitch's grave in Copenhagen. That means that Aron actually achieved one of his goals in live, being immortal :-))

Appart from that I totally agree with calmrolfe, if there ever was a single chessbook who had an profound influence on many people, certainly in Denmark, it was My System by Aron Nimzowitch.

Best wishes
Cairo
tonlesu 6 ( +1 | -1 )
cairo any What are the three most influential chess books?
cairo 27 ( +1 | -1 )
IMHO it is and not necessary in this order:

1. My System v/Aron Nimzowitch.
2. My Sixty Memorable Games v/Robert James Fischer.
3. Basic Chess Endings v/Reuben Fine.

Best wishes
Cairo
calmrolfe 17 ( +1 | -1 )
My best 3 My System / Nimzowitsch
Batsford Chess Openings / Kasparov & Keene
Winning Endgame Technique / Beliavsky
Art of Attack / Vukovic


......doh !... that's four !!

Kind regards,

Cal




soikins 21 ( +1 | -1 )
3 best Nimzowitch "My System"
Nimzowitch "My System in Praxis"
Nimzowitch "How I became Grandmaster"

:))

P.s.
" ...certainly in Denmark..." (cairo), well, in Latvia for shure!
tonlesu 140 ( +1 | -1 )
Nimzovich Excerpts from "How I became a Grandmaster"

In 1904 Tarrasch and Nimzovich played for the first time in Nuremberg. Listen to how Nimzovich describes a little incident that changed the course of chess history.

"Tarrasch granted me the honor of playing a serious game with him. My opening play , as usual, was most bizarre, partly because, at that time I was ill-versed in positional play but partly because I was already consciously avoiding well-worn paths, and, in paticular, regarded the dogmas of the then dominant school not without a certain skepticism."

"A lot of spectators gathered (although the game had an informal character), for, knowing the richness of my combativeness imagination and mistakenly equating this with playing strength, they expected, if not an equal contest--for Tarrasch was then at the height of his fame--then, at any rate, a game full of absorbing interest."

"After the tenth move, Tarrasch, folding his arms across his chest, suddenly made the following pronouncement; 'Never in my life have I had such a won game after ten moves as I have now!'
The game, incidentally, ended in a draw. But for a long time I could not forgive Tarrasch for the 'insult' he inflicted on me in front of all those onlookers."

"...To all my readers I can give the pleasant advice, 'if you wish to achieve results, select a born enemy and attempt to "chastise" him by toppling him from his pedestal.' ...Tarrasch, to me, always meant mediocrity..."
tonlesu 140 ( +1 | -1 )
Nimzovich Excerpts from "How I became a Grandmaster"

In 1904 Tarrasch and Nimzovich played for the first time in Nuremberg. Listen to how Nimzovich describes a little incident that changed the course of chess history.

"Tarrasch granted me the honor of playing a serious game with him. My opening play , as usual, was most bizarre, partly because, at that time I was ill-versed in positional play but partly because I was already consciously avoiding well-worn paths, and, in paticular, regarded the dogmas of the then dominant school not without a certain skepticism."

"A lot of spectators gathered (although the game had an informal character), for, knowing the richness of my combativeness imagination and mistakenly equating this with playing strength, they expected, if not an equal contest--for Tarrasch was then at the height of his fame--then, at any rate, a game full of absorbing interest."

"After the tenth move, Tarrasch, folding his arms across his chest, suddenly made the following pronouncement; 'Never in my life have I had such a won game after ten moves as I have now!'
The game, incidentally, ended in a draw. But for a long time I could not forgive Tarrasch for the 'insult' he inflicted on me in front of all those onlookers."

"...To all my readers I can give the pleasant advice, 'if you wish to achieve results, select a born enemy and attempt to "chastise" him by toppling him from his pedestal.' ...Tarrasch, to me, always meant mediocrity..."